The Public Service Media and Public Service Internet Manifesto

The Internet and the media landscape are broken. The dominant commercial Internet platforms endanger democracy. Despite all the great opportunities the Internet has offered to society and individuals, the digital giants have acquired unparalleled economic, political and cultural power. As currently organised, the Internet separates and divides instead of creating common spaces for negotiating difference and disagreement. Democracy requires Public Service Media and a Public Service Internet.

In the online event, PSM experts will talk about why they support and signed the Manifesto that is the outcome of a discussion and collaboration process organised as part of the AHRC research network InnoPSM: Innovation in Public Service Media Policies.

Read more about the launch event and the Manifesto.

Full text of the Manifesto. Sign the Manifesto.

Occupy the Internet: 200 Media Experts Publish an Alarming Wake Up Call and Demand a Public Service Internet

Launch event of the «Public Service Media and Public Service Internet Manifesto» (June 17th, 2021)

Introduction and presentation: Klaus Unterberger (Austrian Broadcasting Corporation ORF Public Value)

With interventions by Alessandro D’Arma, Roy Cobby Avaria, Leonhard Dobusch, Christian Fuchs, Minna Horowitz, Luciana Musello, Jack L. Qiu, Barbara Thomaß.

Key Principles and Messages of the Manifesto

Principle 1

Democracy and digital democracy require Public Service Media. We call for the safeguarding of the existence of Public Service Media.

Principle 2

A democracy-enhancing Internet requires Public Service Media becoming Public Service Internet platforms that help to advance opportunities and equality in society. We call for the creation of the legal, economic and organisational foundations of such platforms.

Principle 3

Public Service Media content is distinctive from commercial media and data companies. It addresses citizens, not consumers.

Principle 4

Public Service Internet platforms realise fairness, democracy, participation, civic dialogue and engagement on the Internet.

Principle 5

The Public Service Internet requires new formats, new content, and vivid co-operation with the creative sectors of our societies.

Principle 6

Public Service Media should continue to be supported and funded so that they have the resources they need in order to realise and further develop their remit. In addition, the Public Service Internet requires sustainable funding that is based on mechanisms such as the licence fee, the Nordic model of a public service tax, and transnational funding mechanisms.

Principle 7

The Public Service Internet promotes equality and diversity.

Principle 8

The Public Service Internet provides opportunities for public debate, participation, and the advancement of social cohesion.

Principle 9

The Public Service Internet is a driver of change in the creation of new content and services while creating a sustainable ecosystem for media innovations.

Principle 10

Public Service Media and the Public Service Internet contribute to a democratic, sustainable, fair, just, and resilient society.

2 comentarios en “The Public Service Media and Public Service Internet Manifesto

  1. Mensaje de Christian Fuchs recibido el 08/09/2021
    Open access book: The Public Service Media and Public Service Internet Manifesto

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    Christian Fuchs and Klaus Unterberger, eds. 2021. The Public Service Media and Public Service Internet Manifesto. London: University of Westminster Press. 135 pages
    Open access book: http://doi.org/10.16997/book60

    This open access book presents the collectively authored Public Service Media and Public Service Internet Manifesto and accompanying materials.

    The Manifesto has been signed by around 1,000 endorsers, including Jürgen Habermas, Noam Chomsky, International Federation of Journalists, European Federation of Journalists, International Association for Media and Communication Research, European Communication Research and Education Association. It can be signed at http://bit.ly/signPSManifesto

    The Internet and the media landscape are broken. The dominant commercial Internet platforms endanger democracy. They have created a communications landscape overwhelmed by surveillance, advertising, fake news, hate speech, conspiracy theories, and algorithmic politics. Commercial Internet platforms have harmed citizens, users, everyday life, and society. Democracy and digital democracy require Public Service Media. A democracy-enhancing Internet requires Public Service Media becoming Public Service Internet platforms – an Internet of the public, by the public, and for the public; an Internet that advances instead of threatens democracy and the public sphere. The Public Service Internet is based on Internet platforms operated by a variety of Public Service Media, taking the public service remit into the digital age. The Public Service Internet provides opportunities for public debate, participation, and the advancement of social cohesion.

    Accompanying the Manifesto are materials that informed its creation: Christian Fuchs’ report of the results of the Public Service Media/Internet Survey, the written version of Graham Murdock’s online talk on public service media today, and a summary of an ecomitee.com discussion of the Manifesto’s foundations.

    Table of Contents

    Chapter 1: Introduction
    Christian Fuchs and Klaus Unterberger

    Chapter 2: The Public Service Media and Public Service Internet Manifesto

    Chapter 3: The Public Service Media and Public Service Internet Utopias Survey Report
    Christian Fuchs

    Chapter 4: Public Service Media for Critical Times: Connectivity, Climate, and Corona
    Graham Murdock

    Chapter 5: The Future of Public Service Media and the Internet
    Alessandro D’Arma, Christian Fuchs, Minna Horowitz and Klaus Unterberger

    Translations of the Manifesto are available here:
    https://archive.org/details/@public_service_media_and_public_service_internet_manifesto

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  2. The Public Service Media and Public Service Internet Manifesto Newsletter February 2022

    The Public Service Media and Public Service Internet Manifesto you supported has become a huge international success! Until now more than 1,200 individuals and organisations, amongst them Jürgen Habermas and Noam Chomsky, have endorsed it. See http://bit.ly/psmmanifesto

    We want to reach 2,000 signatures. Please help us by spreading the word about the Manifesto, sending the links to http://bit.ly/psmmanifesto and http://bit.ly/signPSManifesto to friends, colleagues, and affiliates and asking them to support the Manifesto.

    We want to thank you for your support. In the midst of social disruption, such as the global COVID-19 pandemic crisis and the enormous pressure on PSM exerted by the digital giants, the Manifesto is a strong signal for democracy and the common good of societies.

    Here is an overview of what has happened recently in respect to the Manifesto:
    #1: The Public Service Media and Public Service Internet Manifesto Book
    #2: Translations of the Manifesto
    #3: Presentations
    #4: Study of Digital Transformation and PSM
    #5: Networking
    #6: Next Steps

    —————————————————————————-
    #1: The Public Service Media and Public Service Internet Manifesto Book

    The Manifesto was published as an open access book with accompanying chapters:

    Christian Fuchs and Klaus Unterberger, eds. 2021. The Public Service Media and Public Service Internet Manifesto. London: University of Westminster Press. 135 pages.
    http://doi.org/10.16997/book60

    —————————————————————————-
    #2: Translations of the Manifesto

    The Manifesto has not just been published in English. Translations in German, Italian, Mandarin, Spanish, and Portuguese are available. All versions here:
    https://archive.org/details/@public_service_media_and_public_service_internet_manifesto

    We thank all those volunteers who helped creating these translations. If you are interested in creating a further translation, contact manifesto@triple-c.at

    —————————————————————————-
    #3: Presentations

    The Manifesto was presented at several events.

    The Manifesto launch event is available as video:

    On October 4, the Austrian Broadcasting Corporation (ORF) dedicated a Public Service Day to the Public Service Internet. A recording (in German) is available here:
    https://zukunft.orf.at/show_content.php?sid=147&pvi_id=2356&pvi_medientyp=v&oti_tag=Dialogforum
    https://zukunft.orf.at/show_content.php?sid=147&pvi_id=2357&pvi_medientyp=v&oti_tag=Dialogforum
    On November 29, Christian Fuchs under the title “The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere and Public Service Media in the Age of Digital Capitalism and COVID-19“ presented theoretical and empirical research on the Public Service Internet at an online event organised by the International Association of Public Media Researchers as part of its IAPMR Dialogues: Prof Slavko Splichal from Ljubljana University acted as respondent. The talk will be available in due course on the IAPMR’s relaunched website and YouTube channel.

    Klaus Unterberger presented the Manifesto at the Internet Governance Forum in Italy:

    —————————————————————————-
    #4: Study of Digital Transformation and PSM

    The Austrian Broadcasting Corporation has published a study of the digital transformation and how it affects PSM. In German:
    https://zukunft.orf.at/show_content.php?sid=147&pvi_id=2355&pvi_medientyp=t&oti_tag=studie
    https://zukunft.orf.at/show_content.php?sid=184&language=en

    See also the English summary of the related study on “Public Network Value”:
    https://zukunft.orf.at/show_content.php?sid=147&pvi_id=1729&pvi_medientyp=t&oti_tag=StudieEnglish

    —————————————————————————-
    #5: Networking

    We have started substantial networking with organisations and institutions. The Manifesto group is closely aligned with the International Association of Public Media Researchers (IAPMR, https://publicmediaresearchers.org/), a formal academic association that has emerged from the organisation of the RIPE conferences (Re-Visionary Interpretations of the Public Enterprise [RIPE]: a series of regular conferences organised since 2001 where research on PSM is presented, see https://www.facebook.com/RIPE-120800838029587/) and whose executive is formed by Dr Alessandro D’Arma (University of Westminster), Maria Michalis (University of Westminster), and Dr Minna Horowitz (University of Helsinki).

    The Manifesto community and IAPMR are a stakeholder that engages in research-informed advocacy for securing the existence, independence, and funding of Public Service Media and advancing PSM in the digital age. This approach is in line and supports EBU’s vision of making PSM “the most creative, trusted and engaging media globally, now and for future generations” and building “the PSM of tomorrow” (https://www.ebu.ch/about/strategy).

    We have been in contact with several European Public Service Media organisations and its international umbrella organisation, the European Broadcasting Union.

    These contacts have resulted in the proposal to establish an international expert group focused on investigating the role of PSM in the digital environment.

    We have connected the Manifesto Initiative to other international platform initiatives such as SDEPS, the coalition of the “Shared Digital European Space (https://sdeps.eu/).

    —————————————————————————-
    #6 Next Steps:

    What are our next steps?

    We ask you to participate in developing new initiatives and projects supporting the idea of a new public Internet- on a regional, national level or together with us. We will investigate and prepare the next steps with the EBU in order to support PSM and at the same time support necessary change. Please let us know about any ideas you have of how to advance debates on how to establish a public Internet.

    We will organise more public debates and discussions focusing on the future of a new public Internet

    Academics and media experts like you are capable to contribute essentially to the future of democracy. Your voice should be heard, when protecting and creating the public sphere

    It is obvious that there’s a momentum of change. At the moment the European Union is deciding on the DMA and the DSA, regulating the tremendous power of GAFAM. Policymakers, as well as citizens around the world, are aware that we cannot let a handful of digital giants control the public communication of democratic societies. A “Global Network of Academics for Democracy” is needed and could have enormous global potential.

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